Web Summit 2017

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We are pleased to announce that Carlos Alvarez Pereira (President of Innaxis) will be participating as a speaker at the Web Summit taking place 6th-9th November 2017 in Lisbon.

The Web Summit is dedicated to connecting the technology community with a range of people from across the global technology industry, as well as with politicians, scientists and influencers. The Web Summit has grown to become the “largest technology conference in the world” with more than 6000 attendees participating this year.

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Carlos will participate at the panel discussion ”Reducing carbon-intensive activity: Will we always have Paris?” on 8th November.

Other panelists will include Javier Garcia-Martinez (University of Alicante), Mohan Munasinghe (Planetiers), Femke Groothuis, (The Ex’tax Project) and Michael Kuhndt (Collaborating Centre on Sustainable Consumption and Production). The panel discussion will be moderated by Sam Geall (China Dialogue).

The panel will investigate the challenge of how to ensure the success of the Paris Climate Agreement, and how to effectively reduce carbon emissions when it conflicts with business interests. Incentives and strategies will be examined in order to re-align business interests with the urgent humanitarian need to address climate change and its disastrous consequences. For this, the role of behavioral change, technologies, political and economic incentives will be part of the discussion

Blockchain and other data science applications for aviation digitalization

For the 5th consecutive year, Innaxis organized the Data Science in Aviation Workshop with much positive feedback. This 2017 edition took place last September at EASA HQ in Cologne, Germany, sponsored by the SafeClouds.eu project.

This series of annual workshops was created in 2013 to promote data science techniques applied to the aviation field. Initially, this was a breakthrough idea as data analytic initiatives in the sector were very scarce. On the other hand, the potential benefit of applying these techniques to aviation, with relatively limited investment, greatly supported the effort of pushing this paradigm shift. Now, only 5 years later, the number of ongoing initiatives of data science applications in the aviation sector has continuously increased; demonstrating that the effort was really worth it.

Data has become the key driver of change all across aviation: from maintenance to training, from fuel efficiency to safety. There are on-going examples, with different levels of maturity, in nearly every layer of the aviation sector. This ranges from manufacturing to operations, both from the industry as well as the academia. The last DSIAW brought together this wide variety. Knowledge discovery and Data Mining (KDD) will be, is currently being, a key enabler of the digitalization of our industry.

The entire Horizon2020 transport research programme is driven by the overall objective of making “European transport greener, safer, more efficient and innovative“. These challenges were precisely the 4 pillars of the 2017 DSIAW, showing how data can play a key role in achieving them through the application of data science (DS) techniques. The presentations were distributed among these 4 sessions: DS4Environment, DS4Safety, DS4Predictability and innovative DS techniques and supporting tools, illustrating the audience with these initiatives:

DS4Environment: While the development of greener technologies (engines, aerostructures, components, etc) require several coordinated initiatives, data science offers cost-effective solutions based on real figures of fuel burnt and noise pollution. Applying data analytics techniques to these datasets enhances our knowledge of fuel consumption and noise emission patterns, which supports efficient resource use, thus resulting in a emissions reduction to minimize environmental impact. For this theme, Boeing Global Services – Fuel Dashboard solution and the Technical University of Madrid initiatives related to environmental and noise emissions studies.

DS4Safety: The aviation sector’s requirement for high safety levels has always been the main reason to avoid ‘radical’ changes in this industry or, at least, follow a very slow adoption path. Nevertheless, aviation safety has recently become a pioneering area in data science applications. We can’t neglect to mention the significant challenges in this line of research, such as data protection, data merging, pattern detection in rare events, secure data infrastructures, etc, but nonetheless there are very promising initiatives such as: the SafeClouds project coordinated by Innaxis, the EASA Data4Safety programme, or the activities from SafetyData in NLP applied to Occurrence Reports. All projects were presented at the workshop.

DS4Predictability: In air transportation, efficiency is very linked to predictability, and predictability in turn, is highly dependent on data. Improving predictability reduces uncertainty which avoids losses and enables a more efficient aviation system from reducing delays to predicting systems failures. Ongoing studies, such as those presented by the University of Westminster or Atos, are good examples on how data can provoke a deep transformation of common airline procedures, like disruption management or maintenance scheduling.

DS techniques and supporting tools: Different KDD application techniques require appropriate infrastructures as well as supporting techniques that ensure various requirements are met. This includes: data protection, security, computation efficiency, flexibility, scability, etc. During this last workshop, we learned from the Eurocontrol experience in using cloud-based infrastructures. We also learned about the Innaxis spin-off, TADOREA, which shared knowledge on crypto-economics as a potential solution for enabling secure data analytics, while maintaining data privacy.

Still not convinced? Wanting to learn more? Visit the event page to watch the presentations and videos.

Workshop: Digital for Sustainability – In Need of a Disruptive Research Agenda

"Digital Transformation" is the buzz phrase of the day. Since the 1980s an explosive growth has happened in Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), and its become pervasive, bringing a perception of tremendous acceleration in technological innovation. There are also high expectations for the role of ICT in sustainable development. Concepts such as disruption, dematerialization and zero marginal costs contribute to the (up to now) false belief that becoming increasingly digital will lead to low resource consumption. However, research shows that the ICT sector itself is not environmentally friendly; it is the fastest growing contributor to emissions, it consumes large amounts of energy, water and critical resources, and produces equally vast amounts of harmful waste with minimal recycling.

To address the generic claim of ICT as contributing to a better and “green” world, there should be mutual recognition and cooperation between digital tech and sustainable development, especially to understand the significant effort needed to harness the power of ICT for human advancement. Digital technologies and sustainability have rarely been analysed together in a rigorous manner. The scientific literature about the nexus of these topics is, up to now worryingly thin, and in many aspects not yet addressing the right questions, much less the responses.

This issue demands a rigorous inquiry of issues at stake and the foundation of a research agenda that builds strong synergies aimed to act beyond current hyped assumptions.

Considering this, Innaxis would like to invite you to the “Digital for Sustainability – In Need of a Disruptive Research Agenda” workshop. This event will be organised during the World Resources Forum on Tuesday 24th October 2017 in Geneva.

The goal of this workshop is to ignite a community of interested parties, who work on interdisciplinary research and action agendas, and to enable the alignment of digital technologies with the goals of sustainable development.

Speakers: Carlos Alvarez Pereira, Ladeja Godina Košir 
Workshop Organisers: Innaxis Research Institute and Texelia AG
Workshop Co-Organiser: Circular Change
Workshop Chairs: Soumaya El Kadiri (Texelia AG) and Joséphine von Mitschke-Collande (Innaxis Research Institute)

Date and time: Tuesday 24th October 2017, 16h30 – 18h30

Venue:
Centre International de Conferences (CICG)
Rue de Varembé 17
1211 Genève - Switzerland

 

Passengers’ environmental awareness and travel behaviour

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Passengers’ travel behaviour can be influenced by various factors, such as disposable income, travel purpose, age group or technological affinity (see also #blogpost7 Passengers expectations: door-to-door travel and beyond). One of these influential factors is the environmental awareness of passengers and in which way it impacts – or even alters – travel behaviour.

Air transportation emits greenhouse gases and hence has a potential harmful effect on our environment in the form of CO2 emissions, for example. Passengers contribute to this by their choice of means of transport, their choice of holiday destinations and kilometres travelled (Cohen and Higham, 2011; Brouwer et al., 2008).

Overall, air travel passengers seem to have a basic understanding of the environmental impact and many also have pro-environmental values. However, according to several studies it does not result into behaviour changes of passengers yet. It is hence not a factor influencing their holiday planning, the choice of a destination and the type of transportation (Hares et al., 2009; Böhler et al., 2006). Research also reveals that the willingness of passengers to pay for carbon offsetting schemes, one possibility to neutralize emissions generated by one’s own journey without compromising the means of transport or influencing the decision on holiday destinations, is low as well (Eijgelaar, 2009; Mair, 2011).

The three main barriers towards pro-environmental behaviour change are a lack of alternative transport systems, the high value of holidays with the freedom to travel to every destination one wants, and the lack of feeling personal responsibility for climate change (Hares et al., 2009; Böhler et al., 2006). However, within some recent studies, evidence emerged showing an increasingly pro-environmental awareness in passengers’ mind-set and a willingness to actually change air travel behaviour in the future (Cohen and Higham, 2011; Gössling et al., 2009).

To sum up, environmental awareness among passengers seems to be already present but does not lead to current behaviour changes. This, among other factors, will be explored within DATASET2050 and it will be modelled how such drivers influence the travel demand of air transport passengers in the future.

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References

  • Böhler, S., Grischkat, S., Haustein, S. and Hunecke, M., 2006. Encouraging environmentally sustainable holiday travel. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 40(8), 652-670.
  • Brouwer, R., Brander, L. and Van Beukering, P., 2008, “A convenient truth”: air travel passengers‟ willingness to pay to offset their CO2 emissions, Climatic Change, 90(3), 299-313.
  • Cohen, S.A. and Higham, J.E., 2011, Eyes wide shut? UK consumer perceptions on aviation climate impacts and travel decisions to New Zealand, Current Issues in Tourism, 14(4), 323-335.
  • Eijgelaar, E., 2009, Voluntary carbon offsets a solution for reducing tourism emissions? Assessment of communication aspects and mitigation potential, Transport and Tourism: Challenges, Issues and Conflicts, 46-64.
  • Gössling, S., Haglund, L., Kallgren, H., Revahl, M. and Hultman, J., 2009, Swedish air travellers and voluntary carbon offsets: towards the co-creation of environmental value?, Current Issues in Tourism, 12(1), 1-19.
  • Hares, A., Dickinson, J. and Wilkes, K., 2009, Climate change and the air travel decisions of UK tourists. Journal of Transport Geography, 18(3), 466-473.
  • Mair, J., 2011, Exploring air travellers‟ voluntary carbon-offsetting behavior, Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 19(2), 215-230.

DATASET2050 presented at ACARE

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DATASET2050 participation in ACARE WG1 Meeting (Brussels, June 3, 2015)

Bauhaus Luftfahrt actively participated in the Advisory Council for Aviation Research and Innovation in Europe (ACARE) Working Group 1 Meeting on June 3, 2015 in Brussels on behalf of DATASET2050. ACARE’s main task is to provide a network for strategic research in aeronautics and air transport and to identifying strategic directions for aviation research and industry. The members of ACARE are organised in five working groups: (1) Mobility, (2) Competitiveness, (3) Environment and Energy, (4) Safety and Security, and (5) Resources. Within the different working groups experts from industry, science and politics meet regularly to discuss and define key topics and to monitor progress regarding mobility and air transportation related research. Three partners of DATASET2050 are part of ACARE: Bauhaus, EUROCONTROL and Innaxis. Working Group 1, in particular, is concerned with the societal and market needs and how these can be met in the future. Main objectives of the meeting in Brussels on June 3 were an update on the identification of bottlenecks within the current transport system and the respective formulation of research needs. Furthermore, three current projects within the scope of WG1 were presented: DATASET2050, DORA, and PASSME.

The DORA project starting in June 2015 (“Door to Door Information for Air Passengers”) focuses on passenger door-to-door travel and the provision of an integrated information system along the entire journey. The goal of the PASSME (“Personalised Airport Systems for Seamless Mobility and Experience”) project is to reduce passenger travel time by 60 minutes by introducing novel solutions (up to TRL6). These may include systems to provide predictive analysis of passenger flows or redesigned airport and aircraft processes that speed up the passenger journey and add to a hassle-free travel experience. Although these two projects have a different focus, both are concerned with enhancing the passenger journey and addressing door-to-door travel. This yields potential for valuable future exchange between the different partners and for the different work packages in DATASET2050.

The presentation of DATASET2050 at this particular meeting mainly focused on the work scope of work package 3, passenger demand profile. The intention of WP3 is to understand in a better way the current as well as the future transport system from the user perspective. For this purpose, travel behaviour is depicted by collecting a range of data on passenger needs and expectations for different time horizons. As depicted in step 1 in the figure, this demand is derived from a range of data sources: First, macro data, such as information on demographics or income, is collected to obtain a broad basis for the differentiation of population groups (as addressed in Blog Post #5). To introduce a transport-specific focus, passenger travel behaviour is analysed by looking at modal shares, traffic patterns and flows, e.g. travel times and destinations, as well as the availability and constitution of airport access modes. The characteristics derived from macro and transport-specific data are complemented by specific passenger attributes. High affinity for technology, for example, can be one feature that characterizes a certain type of passenger. Passengers might also place high emphasis on individualized products such as customized meals or entertainment programs during a flight.

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Approach towards the derivation of distinct passenger clusters and requirements

The data is used to define specific demand profiles, i.e. to differentiate between a variety of passenger groups beyond the traditional classification of business, leisure, and visiting friends and relatives (step 2 in the figure). For example, one group may be characterized by travellers in the age group 20 to 25 with a high affinity for state-of-the-art technology solutions, travelling on a low budget to visit both friends and families across different European cities.

For each defined passenger demand profile (“passenger clusters”) requirements for the current as well as future transport system (2035 and 2050) are defined (step 3 in figure). A specification resulting from such a cluster can be the provision of aligned travel information along the entire journey. This means that all involved transport providers share information on schedules and expected delays to provide passengers with dynamic real-time information. These current and future requirements are then used to identify bottlenecks within passenger door-to-door transport and to design approaches how these can be addressed within future transport systems.

References:

ACARE: http://www.acare4europe.com/

PASSME: http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/193396_en.html

DORA: http://cordis.europa.eu/project/rcn/193356_en.html

Innaxis is appointed as United Nations Observer Organisation

Innaxis has received word that it has been granted Observer status for the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

This permits Innaxis to participate in certain events and activities of the UNFCCC. There are over 1,297 observer organisations around the world with only 16 from Spain.

This is a great accomplishment for Innaxis and the environmental research treads that Innaxis is promoting; we look forward to collaborating with other observer organisations and talking to influential individuals about the key topics of today.

Derogations of an EU Regulation

Emissions Trading Scheme, Kyoto, cap and trade, Climate Exchange, law of demand- all have been mentioned under the hot topic of CO2 emissions and climate change policies. With all of the concern of global warming- it’s no surprise that countries are trying to ´go green´ now too.

In recent news, French EU Presidency has proposed a compromise designed to overcome opposition to EU climate plans from some of the heavy industries and newer member states. The French EU Presidency is asking for early identification of industries exposed to foreign competition and temporary exemptions from full CO2 permit auctioning for coal-dependent economies.

Some member states disagreed with the proposal. Poland’s secretary of state for European affairs, Mikolaj Dowgielewicz states, “The proposed measures open the door to the phenomenon of windfall profits for power companies. Our objective is not to create more profits for energy companies. Our objective is to protect consumers.”

CO2 emissions have long been a concern for production companies. At higher CO2-prices, companies are tempted to pass the costs down to the final consumer. However, when faced with a price increase, the consumer will demand less and substitute more. Production from the company will decrease, and imports of substitutes into the country will increase. This leads to a carbon emissions leak- another outcome that countries are trying to avoid.  However, in some industries such as the paper industry, this practice has already been banned. Emissions Trading Scheme costs cannot be passed down to the final consumer because of the heavy international competition.

Opinions concerning the trade of carbon emission permits have been wide-range. Some believe it’s an expensive bureaucratic solution to fix a problem that may not even exist, and others believe it’s a great policy to try to save the world from the global warming time bomb.

In either case many economists agree that a policy regulating carbon emissions, no matter how unorganized or unfair, is better than no-policy at all. Many countries have adapted their own plan under the international KYOTO plan, including the European Union’s Emissions Trading Scheme. The United States has yet to confirm to the KYOTO plan, but future president Obama has stated that some kind of environmental policy is in plan for the future.

The proposal calls for the European Commission to ‘rapidly’ produce figures that set a threshold to quantify the risk of certain industries becoming exposed to competition by third countries with less stringent CO2 reduction regimes. However, with the upcoming International negotiations towards the KYOTO Protocol to be finalised in Dec. 2009, the request may be viewed as a wrong signal.

Many countries rely on certain resources for over half of their power generation portfolio. For example, Poland relies on coal for 60% of their portfolio.

The economic and environmental plan of emissions trading is proving to be more complex than ever. It’s hard to bring the world, or even just a group of countries together to bring about a significant change. The complex system of CO2 trading and it’s effects on the economy is certainly one to pay attention to.

The Council, Commission and Parliament are due to continue this trialogue next Tuesday (25 November) to reach a deal to be agreed at the European Council on 17 December.

A transport network is a complex network- TEN-T Policy

On the 14th and 15th of October, the European Commission held a stakeholder conference to review the trans-European transport network policy. Important input was contributed for the drafting of the Commission’s Green Paper on the future of TEN-T policy. This paper will be published in early 2009.

The transport network policy (TEN-T) is part of a wider system, TEN, or Trans-European Networks. Within the system is TEN-T, as well as TEN-E (Energy), and eTEN (E-systems). The transportation TEN-T policy is more than the sum of 27 national transport infrastructure programmes.

Transport network is linked to the environmental policy- transport strategy concerning emissions 20% of emissions, 20% renewable 20% reduction in the use of energy all done by year 2020.

As this transport policy concerns the use and dependency on oil, it is concurrently linked to the environment policy. Many substitutes are being evaluated including Bio fuels, Hydrogen and fuel cells, and electricity. However since some elements such as bio fuel isn’t considered as ´clean´ studies are still being conducted.

The completion of important cross-border high-speed railway axes is a challenging goal, especially since talks mentioned links to outside of Europe specifically Morocco-Africa. Network links to airports and ports were also placed as a priority.

As this intricate cross-border network with concern for the climate change, competitiveness, and social and economic cohesion, becomes ever more multi-faceted; the need for a complex systems network intensifies. The understanding of complexity science, which is the establishment of a complex system, is valuable when trying to complete such a demanding project.

David Perez, the director of The Innaxis Research Institute, attended the conference and believes Innaxis may be able to play a part. Spain has a similar project, Aero-Ave, which concerns constructing a network between air and land transportation. Innaxis has already submitted a proposal to contribute to the national project and is looking into what they can do on the international level.

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