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Current European PAX Profiles

Have you ever wondered about all the different people at the airport? Almost all of us have already flown: for going on holidays, visiting friends and family or going on a business trip. Likewise, many have been sitting at the airport, waiting at the gate and watching different passengers walking past. An airport is a melting pot where people of all ages, backgrounds, income levels and interests come together. As part of the DATASET2050 project, passenger characteristics are examined and six general passenger profiles (PAX profiles) are generated to gain an understanding of what distinguishes current European air travellers.

These PAX profiles are derived using existing passenger studies as well as data on demographical, geographical, socio-economic and behavioural aspects. At first, profiles are distinguished by travel purpose, i.e. whether passenger travel for personal or for business reasons. Since the amount of passengers travelling for private reasons exceeds that of passengers travelling for business reasons (on average across all EU28 + EFTA countries ten per cent business trips), there are four groups describing leisure passengers and two groups describing business travellers, as can be seen in the figure below. Following, passenger groups are assigned to pre-defined age intervals taken from an analysis of European countries as well as respective average travel activity within the particular age group.

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Figure: PAX profiles according to travel purpose and age intervals with example profile information for “Executives”, “Family and Holiday Traveller” and “Best Agers” (own depiction based on PAX profile analysis)

All six passenger groups also differ by their income level. “Executives” have a high income; “Youngsters” have a low income and the remaining passenger groups have a medium income. Income alone has a great impact on travel budget and consequently on travel behaviour, i.e. how often someone is travelling or which transport mode is used to access the airport. Furthermore, the use of technical devices throughout the entire journey depends on age groups. Hence, all six passenger groups differ by the level of frequency in regard to mobile phone and internet usage. This translates to their booking and travelling behaviour as well. “Youngsters” and “Executives” are the two passenger groups using information and communication technologies (ICT) with a high frequency. “Youngsters”, for example, are digitally savvy and more likely to complete travel related tasks online compared to the group of “Best Agers”. Such processes along the journey could be online check-in or generating a boarding card on a mobile device.

The value of time also influences travel behaviour as passengers who value time a lot tend to save time along their journey and vice versa. Among all six PAX profiles, “Executives” and “Price-conscious Business Traveller” value time the most which is reflected, for instance, by their time-saving choice of hand luggage only. In contrast, “Youngsters” are young, often students or apprentices, and time rich but money poor. To compensate their low income, they tend to use public transport (often the longer access mode choice) to save money as they do not mind the additional time spent in public transport. “Family and Holiday Traveller” and “Best Agers” also have a rather low value of time.

The six passenger groups also differ by their length of stay. The trip length in terms of nights staying is another parameter influencing the amount of luggage a particular passenger is taking along the journey. The amount of nights spent at a particular destination differs both by travel purpose and by type of journey conducted. Business travellers tend to spend fewer nights per trip than leisure passengers. And “Youngsters” visiting friends in urban centres spend less nights than “Family and Holiday Traveller” on their summer vacation. In turn, this may influence the access mode selected, the time spent in luggage check-in processes, or during luggage collection at the destination airport. For instance, in order to minimize time and effort accrued to respective handling processes, business passengers reduce the amount of luggage taken along. Finally, it is important to mention that one person can be assigned to several PAX profiles. A manager of an international company can travel for business purposes (being assigned to the group of “Executives”) and in private life being a dad and flying with his wife and two children into the summer vacation (being a “Family and Holiday Traveller”).

More information on the PAX profiles and the analysis can be found in the DATASET2050 report “Data driven approach for a Seamless Efficient Travelling in 2050”.

ComplexityCosts holds Close-Out Meeting

After more than four years of intensive research the SESAR WP-E project ComplexityCosts has finally concluded. Project partners from the University of Westminster and Innaxis gathered with experts at the EUROCONTROL Experimental Centre in Brétigny-sur-Orge, France in early October to discuss the project results and close the research activities.

The ComplexityCosts study focused on the trade-offs between several disturbances and mechanisms from a passenger and stakeholder’s costs perspective. A major highlight of the project was the concept of resilience costs and further identifying a metric to effectively measure it.

The research continues on within the Horizon2020 DATASET2050 and SESAR LTER Vista projects, so stay tuned for further developments on mobility research.

SafeClouds kick off meeting

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SafeClouds.eu, a H2020 big data for safety project, coordinated by Innaxis, kicked off earlier this month.

SafeClouds is the recently launched H2020 aviation-safety project. It is coordinated by Innaxis, with 15 additional entities (including airlines, ANSPs, EASA, Eurocontrol, various research entities, etc) from 8 different countries.
The aim of SafeClouds is to improve aviation safety by developing state-of-art big data and data analysis tools. The consortium will build a coordinated platform to combine and share data among different aviation actors.
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DATASET2050 presentation at Data Science in Aviation Workshop (EASA, Cologne-Germany)

The annual event exploring Data Science in Aviation (ComplexWorld funded; organized by Innaxis) has recently celebrated its fourth edition this past September 8th 2016. The event was hosted on the EASA premises in Cologne, Germany . This year it highlighted a presentation of the DATASET2050 project, “Data Science for Mobility”, by project coordinator Samuel Cristobal (Innaxis).

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On the Data Science In Aviation event:

Previous editions of the Data Science in Aviation event were hosted in Madrid 2013, Paris 2014 and Brussels 2015. The popular event usually draws attendance from more than 80 individuals from top European and worldwide aviation entities (including Airbus, Eurocontrol, Boeing, EASA, Airlines, Airports, ANSPs, SESAR , Universities, etc) along with ICT and data-related entities (including CERN researchers, Fraunhofer, Infrastructure-related, and various universities). Notable presenters from the 2016 edition included EASA, Innaxis, NATS, Eurocontrol, Boeing, ENAC and Fraunhofer.

In terms of the event agenda and content, the presentations has traditionally outlined how data science is understood as a useful set of fundamental principles that support and guide the principled extraction of information and knowledge from aviation data. Furthermore, the discipline leans on well-known data-mining techniques, and goes far beyond these techniques with successful data-science paradigms which provide specific applications in various air transport areas (safety, performance, mobility etc).

 

On DATASET2050 Samuel’s presentation:

The event also highlighted a key presentation from Innaxis project coordinator, Samuel Cristobal. Samuel presented five different points on data science in aviation.

  • First, he explained how some of the data science tools, techniques and concepts have been used in the mobility context, specifically using the DATASET2050 project as a case example.
  • Second, Samuel explained the different door to door phases under analysis (door-kerb; kerb-gate; gate-gate; kerb-door), which helps to delve deeper in the different data science components within aviation phases.
  • Third, Samuel outlined the different links between project objectives and overall Flightpath2050 goals.
  • The fourth point explored mobility data in Europe, and the value of the DATASET approach in this context.
  • The presentation concluded with a fifth and final point announcing the next communication actions. The full presentation can be accessed here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/91julyl8gsij2k9/DATASET_SC_v1.pdf?dl=0

 

In sum, the fourth edition of the Data Science in Aviation event was an excellent opportunity for dissemination of DATASET2050. This was in conjunction with a fruitful exchange of ideas with other aviation data scientists, some of whom working with similar tools in other sub-areas far from mobility. We hope to continue this momentum of knowledge exchange and look forward to a potential fifth edition of the popular event.

 

You can watch DATASET2050 Samuel’s presentation here, and the rest of the event videos at Innaxis’ Vimeo channel.

Mobility presentation at Data Science In Aviation workshop (EASA, 2016)

The annual event exploring Data Science in Aviation (ComplexWorld funded; organized by Innaxis) has recently celebrated its fourth edition this past September 8th 2016. The event was hosted on the EASA premises in Cologne, Germany . This year it highlighted a presentation of the DATASET2050 project, “Data Science for Mobility”, by project coordinator Samuel Cristobal (Innaxis).

 

 

On the Data Science In Aviation event:

Previous editions of the Data Science in Aviation event were hosted in Madrid 2013, Paris 2014 and Brussels 2015. The popular event usually draws attendance from more than 80 individuals from top European and worldwide aviation entities (including Airbus, Eurocontrol, Boeing, EASA, Airlines, Airports, ANSPs, SESAR , Universities, etc) along with ICT and data-related entities (including CERN researchers, Fraunhofer, Infrastructure-related, and various universities). Notable presenters from the 2016 edition included EASA, Innaxis, NATS, Eurocontrol, Boeing, ENAC and Fraunhofer.

In terms of the event agenda and content, the presentations has traditionally outlined how data science is understood as a useful set of fundamental principles that support and guide the principled extraction of information and knowledge from aviation data. Furthermore, the discipline leans on well-known data-mining techniques, and goes far beyond these techniques with successful data-science paradigms which provide specific applications in various air transport areas (safety, performance, mobility etc).

 

On DATASET2050 Samuel’s presentation:

The event also highlighted a key presentation from Innaxis project coordinator, Samuel Cristobal. Samuel presented five different points on data science in aviation.

  • First, he explained how some of the data science tools, techniques and concepts have been used in the mobility context, specifically using the DATASET2050 project as a case example.
  • Second, Samuel explained the different door to door phases under analysis (door-kerb; kerb-gate; gate-gate; kerb-door), which helps to delve deeper in the different data science components within aviation phases.
  • Third, Samuel outlined the different links between project objectives and overall Flightpath2050 goals.
  • The fourth point explored mobility data in Europe, and the value of the DATASET approach in this context.
  • The presentation concluded with a fifth and final point announcing the next communication actions. The full presentation can be accessed here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/91julyl8gsij2k9/DATASET_SC_v1.pdf?dl=0

 

In sum, the fourth edition of the Data Science in Aviation event was an excellent opportunity for dissemination of DATASET2050. This was in conjunction with a fruitful exchange of ideas with other aviation data scientists, some of whom working with similar tools in other sub-areas far from mobility. We hope to continue this momentum of knowledge exchange and look forward to a potential fifth edition of the popular event.

Recent News from Innaxis – August Newsletter

Every two months Innaxis publishes a newsletter with curated content from all of the Innaxis researchers giving updates on the most innovative developments in complexity science research.

Click the image below to read the August newsletter, covering activities from June-May.

 





Information, time, knowledge

We live in a world that gathers exponentially increasing amounts of information/data coming from endless sources, and a limited time to analyse it.

What is the current speed of “creating” information/data? What about knowledge/wisdom? What is the role of Data Science and Big Data in this context?

Food for thought for your -deserved- summer break! Enjoy, charge your batteries and get ready for a 2016/2017 year full of cutting-edge research, innovation (and Innaxis blogposts!)

 

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Innaxis at ICRAT 2016

Between June 20 to 24, our PhD student Seddik Belkoura went at the very doorstep of the famous Rocky Balboa Statue, as the seventh edition of the International Conference on Air Transport (ICRAT) was held at Drexel University (Philadelphia, USA) . This successful event, co-organised by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration-USA) and EUROCONTROL, put the emphasis the next generation of researchers, with a strong participations of students keen on interacting with more mature and expert minds.

 

In Seddik’s presentation during the conference, he wanted to highlight the dynamic nature of the delay propagation process in Air Transportation. He showed in his talk that abnormal delays at a given airport (those with an unexpected magnitude) can perturb the way the delays are propagated in “normal” conditions. The quantity of “surprise” necessary to disrupt an airport can be quantifiable, and an approximation of the additional delay necessary to disrupt the propagative dynamics of each airport have been proposed by Seddik. The audience’s interest at this point indicated that work have still have to be done to master all the complex behaviours of some processes like delay propagations.

 

The event was a success, and the areas of investigation within Air Transportation were quite wide. One special note have been noticed by Seddik: the growing number of presentation (and attention) to drones. The recentness of the concept and the velocity with which it develops and spreads is such that it deserves a special attention. Legislation are not yet fully explicit and a lot of work to design the “future” if happening right now. It is the moment to use our experience with Aviation to better fashion the drone system. Specifically, the importance of data should be pointed out, to allow a better development and a continuous improvement of this new and growing complex system.

 

Seddik’s paper and the presentation about drones will be soon available on the official website of the conference (http://www.icrat.org/)

IcratBlog

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Passengers’ environmental awareness and travel behaviour

Passengers’ travel behaviour can be influenced by various factors, such as disposable income, travel purpose, age group or technological affinity (see also #blogpost7 Passengers expectations: door-to-door travel and beyond). One of these influential factors is the environmental awareness of passengers and in which way it impacts – or even alters – travel behaviour.

Air transportation emits greenhouse gases and hence has a potential harmful effect on our environment in the form of CO2 emissions, for example. Passengers contribute to this by their choice of means of transport, their choice of holiday destinations and kilometres travelled (Cohen and Higham, 2011; Brouwer et al., 2008).

Overall, air travel passengers seem to have a basic understanding of the environmental impact and many also have pro-environmental values. However, according to several studies it does not result into behaviour changes of passengers yet. It is hence not a factor influencing their holiday planning, the choice of a destination and the type of transportation (Hares et al., 2009; Böhler et al., 2006). Research also reveals that the willingness of passengers to pay for carbon offsetting schemes, one possibility to neutralize emissions generated by one’s own journey without compromising the means of transport or influencing the decision on holiday destinations, is low as well (Eijgelaar, 2009; Mair, 2011).

The three main barriers towards pro-environmental behaviour change are a lack of alternative transport systems, the high value of holidays with the freedom to travel to every destination one wants, and the lack of feeling personal responsibility for climate change (Hares et al., 2009; Böhler et al., 2006). However, within some recent studies, evidence emerged showing an increasingly pro-environmental awareness in passengers’ mind-set and a willingness to actually change air travel behaviour in the future (Cohen and Higham, 2011; Gössling et al., 2009).

To sum up, environmental awareness among passengers seems to be already present but does not lead to current behaviour changes. This, among other factors, will be explored within DATASET2050 and it will be modelled how such drivers influence the travel demand of air transport passengers in the future.

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References

  • Böhler, S., Grischkat, S., Haustein, S. and Hunecke, M., 2006. Encouraging environmentally sustainable holiday travel. Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, 40(8), 652-670.
  • Brouwer, R., Brander, L. and Van Beukering, P., 2008, “A convenient truth”: air travel passengers‟ willingness to pay to offset their CO2 emissions, Climatic Change, 90(3), 299-313.
  • Cohen, S.A. and Higham, J.E., 2011, Eyes wide shut? UK consumer perceptions on aviation climate impacts and travel decisions to New Zealand, Current Issues in Tourism, 14(4), 323-335.
  • Eijgelaar, E., 2009, Voluntary carbon offsets a solution for reducing tourism emissions? Assessment of communication aspects and mitigation potential, Transport and Tourism: Challenges, Issues and Conflicts, 46-64.
  • Gössling, S., Haglund, L., Kallgren, H., Revahl, M. and Hultman, J., 2009, Swedish air travellers and voluntary carbon offsets: towards the co-creation of environmental value?, Current Issues in Tourism, 12(1), 1-19.
  • Hares, A., Dickinson, J. and Wilkes, K., 2009, Climate change and the air travel decisions of UK tourists. Journal of Transport Geography, 18(3), 466-473.
  • Mair, J., 2011, Exploring air travellers‟ voluntary carbon-offsetting behavior, Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 19(2), 215-230.

EU Door-to-Door Mobility Workshop: 12th July 2016

We’re pleased to host and coordinate the first workshop examining EU door-to-door mobility.
An outline of sessions can be found below (abstracts are here).

Date: 12th July 2016. 10:30 – 17:00 (approx)

Location: 309 Regent Street, London W1B 2HW University of Westminster, UK

10:00 refreshments on arrival

Welcome and introduction – University of Westminster (PDF)

  • Session 1. Challenges of a data-driven model

The DATASET2050 model

The current state of mobility in EuropeUniversity of Westminster (PDF)
Which journeys are in scope when measuring the 4-hour door-to-door target?
What data sources are available for the current and future models?
Meeting the passenger’s demand: current and futureBauhaus Luftfahrt (PDF)
Challenges ahead: how will we model 2035 and 2050?
Assessing current supply and demand profiles.
Developing a new model for European mobility Innaxis (PDF)
What new metrics (and segmentations) do we need, apart from simply measuring average journey times?
Analytical approach – what metrics are needed?
What is the current status of such journeys – latest progress with the model.

  • Session 2. Further exploring the journey process phase by phase – where are the efficiency gains?

Door-to-kerbKai Nagel, Technical University of Berlin (PDF)
Improved airport accessibility: intermodal mobility; efficiencies of different modes (e.g. better utilisation of road-based modes – fuller cars/taxis; prioritisation schemes); modal shift; integration and passenger confidence.
Kerb-to-gateGenovefa Kefalidou, Horizon 2020 PASSME project (PDF)
Reducing door-to-door airport travel time for passengers in Europe.
Providing passengers with real-time information on predicted demand for airport services.
Improving the airport experience for passengers.
Gate-to-gateSteve Williams, NATS (PDF)
The impact of new SESAR solutions aimed at improving gate-to-gate operations, including free-routing, business trajectories, functional airspace blocks and ATM performance targets.
The role of wider EU policies such as Regulation 261/2004.

  • Session 3. Looking ahead to 2035 and 2050

Futures near and farChristoph Schneider, Munich Airport (PDF)
Evolution of demand – market maturities, new technologies and travel patterns.
From where will the key performance improvements come? – panel discussion (PDF)
Major improvements and barriers. Is the 4-hour target achievable – at what price? What should be the role of regulation and policy?
Close and wrap-upUniversity of Westminster (PDF)

Registration: Attendance is free of charge, however the number of places are limited.
Dynamic conversations and exchanges of views are encouraged at the workshop.

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